The Future Lies With E-Government – Yogyakarta is Leading the Way

The Future Lies With E-Government – Yogyakarta is Leading the Way
18/07/2011

Indonesia

11 - 17 July 2011. After months of preparing their best practice replication, a high-ranking delegation from Songhkla, Thailand, felt inspired by the vision of a paperless government they encountered in Yogyakarta, Indonesia.

Anticipation had been high: having studied the award-winning scheme of Yogyakarta to introduce and expand electronic access to an ever increasing number of government services in great detail, the 11-member strong delegation was excited to be able to see the scheme in practice. During their action-filled days, the visitors made their way to the various departments that have switched to e-services, including the e-procurement unit and the one-stop services, which allows citizens to deal with various different government services in one place.
Many details became clearer: the precise nature of the support the central government offered in the development phase of the project, especially in the area of e-procurement, one of the most successful elements of the scheme. E-procurement can (and has in Yogyakarta) increase the efficiency of public services and decrease corruption. The visitors were also intrigued by the innovation of recording research from academic institutions on a central database, which can be used as a basis for urban planning. Of particular relevance – and a point not to be forgotten when it comes to implementing the best practice in Songhkla – was the realization of the training needs for local staff to bring them up to speed with the technological advances and to imbue them with the right attitude to customer service, which is at the heart of the system. Introducing a 2-way communication and feedback information system was seen as an ingenious way to increase customer satisfaction and people participation.
Clearly, e-government has proved to be a win-win situation for Yogyakarta – a tool to increase the opportunity for and channels of communication between government units and citizens while at the same time allowing people to save time and money on accessing public services. The feedback of the visitors was overwhelmingly positive, with regrets that they would have loved to spend more time exploring this fascinating scheme in even greater detail.